Friday, November 30, 2012

Textolite: Plastic Laminate By General Electric Popular In The 1950s


Plastic Counter Tops Called Textolite Came In Many Colors And  
Patterns

Textolite was the name of General Electric's Plastic counter tops (surfacing) popular in the 1950s. The company advertised these tops as good looking surfaces for tables, work surfaces, doors and wall paneling, show cases, window sills, wainscoting, furniture, elevator interiors and lavatroy vanities.

Plastics That Could Resist Boiling Water

GE promised that this plastic top would resist boiling water, hot grease, fruit acids and alcohol and that these surfaces would wipe clean with a damp cloth. Waxing was optional. Textolite was
touted as a product that wears like iron but cleans like glass.

Textolite Patterns

Housewives of the 1950s could choose plastic surfaces made by Textolite in many different colors and patterns. GE divided its plastics into "Soid colors', Natural wood", "Pearl", "Regent", "Cross Current" , "Hyaline", "Medley", Irish Linen" and "Velo".

Solid Colors of Textolite
Geranium Red
Gray
Powder Blue
Royal Blue
Crimson
Green mansions
Flame
Yellow

Medley Colors of Textolite
Yellow
Green
Coral
Blue

Hyaline Colors of Textolite
Slate
Blue
Rose Quartz
Green

Pearl Color of Textolite
Green
Blue
Gray
Gray Crystalite
Red
Yellow





C. Dianne Zweig is the author of Hot Kitchen & Home Collectibles of the 30s, 40s, 50s and Hot Cottage Collectibles for Vintage Style Homes. She is also the Editor of Iantiqueonline.com an actively growing internet based resource community for people who buy, sell or collect antiques, collectibles and art. You can find Dianne’s fabulous retro and vintage kitchen, home and cottage collectibles at The Collinsville Antiques Company of New Hartford, CT, a 22,000 feet antique emporium with an in-house retro cafĂ©.

To read more articles by C. Dianne Zweig click on this link:
C. Dianne Zweig’s Blog Kitsch ‘n Stuff

Email me at dianne@cdiannezweig.com

Visit my website, CDianneZweig.com

Dianne is a member of:
The American Society of Journalists and Authors
The Authors Guild, Inc.

1 comment:

  1. Thanks, Professor Zweig! I am especially fond of your history lessons. I love learning about anything and everything vintage. Keep blogging!

    Helene

    ReplyDelete

ShareThis