Sunday, June 6, 2010

Glasbake Kitchen Collectibles: McKee's Ovenware

Who Made Glasbake? The Kitschy Collector Gets To The Bottom Of This Mystery

Today I am getting to the bottom of the term "Glasbake" ? Here is the scoop....In 1917 The McKee Glass Company introduced "Glasbake Ovenware to compete with Pyrex ovenware which
was made by Corning Glass Works.

Glasbak was the original spelling for McKee's ovenware, but was changed to Glasbake sometime later.

"Glasbak" Versus "Glasbake" : History of Glasbake

According to Cathy and Gene Florence (Kitchen Glassware of The Depression Years) "Glassbake" was originally referred to as "Glasbak Ware" An early product brochure advertises "Glasbak" as "A Sanitary Baking Ware and Serving Ware Combined" which is made of glass.

McKee Glass Company

Later Glasbak would be spelled with an "e" Glasbake (1917-1953, followed by "Glasbake by McKee Divison of Thatcher Glass Corp., 1951-1961 and "Glasbake by Jeannette Glass, 1961-1983. Thatcher Glass sold the Mckee factory in the 1960s to Jeanette Glass.

Markings

Glasbake made by Jeanette after 1961 usually have a J prefix followed by a number on the bottom of each piece. (Kitchen Glasswares off The Depression Years-Cathy and Gene Florence. You will also see sellers refer to their items as "Glassbake". And some sellers refer to every kind of ovenware as "Glassbake" .

Glasbake: From Oven to Refrigerator
The beauty of "Glasbake" was that it was designed to be able to be used for cooking, serving and storing. More and more, returning to the use of glass in today's kitchen is becoming popular on environmentally conscious homeowners.

Can You Put Glasbake in The Microwave?

The term "Heat Resistant" is used on many Glasbake products instead of "Oven Proof". According to Cathy and Gene Florence (Florences Ovenware, Collectorbooks.com) , heavier Glasbake mugs can withstand use in the microwave. You will find some later editions of Glasbake mugs actually marked Microwave safe.

The Florences suggest testing earlier mugs by putting them in the microwave for ten seconds and seeing if the mugs gets hot. If it does, it may not withstand the microwave. The Florences do not discuss other types of Glasbake ovenware pieces. pieces.

Patterns and Styles Of Glasbake

Flamex

The "Glasbake" product was made in a variety of glass styles and patterns. For example, Sears and Roebuck sold "Crystal" Glass Cookware called "Flamex" which came in sets or individual pieces. Are you holding onto your hats? Flamex sold as a ten piece set for $1.49 back in the day.
You could even find a huge oven roaster (think Turkey) for $2.25. Mark Hargreaves produced a CD on Flamex, for more information about this topic visit: http://www.oldstuff.com/

Safe Bake

Safe Bake is a "Glasbake" product in heart shaped baking dishes. This product has a "Saben Glass Company" but is Glasbake.

Cameo With "Urn" Glasbake and "Cameo" Glasbake

Made by McKee Divison of Thatcher Glass manufacturing Company. Cameo Glasbak was advertised to serve oven-to-table in glass that looked as lovely as china. The advertisements read " Cameo in Glasbake contrasts classic Grecian figures in white against a background of soft Olympic Blue. There is also a "Cameo" pattern.

Currier and Ives

The Jeanette Glass Company issued a Glasbake pattern called "Currier and Ives". Currier and Ives is also made by Federal and Fire-King wares according to Cathy and Gene Florence. A full boxed set of this style would sell for $140-150.00.

"Wild Rose" Glasbake"

A floral rose pattern on white glass, this pattern is quite attractive and sought after.Prices are higher for these pieces because of their sweet look. You will find lovely photos of "Wild Rose" in a butter dish, refrigerator dish (two sizes) and also in a lovely covered canister set in Florence's Ovenware book by Collectorbooks.com.

Bakers and Casseroles of Glasbake

Probably most of us are familiar with this cute individual bakers. I have heard many people refer to them as "soup bowls". But they were originally advertised as "French Casseroles". They come in a variety of colors. Some complete sets come with serving tiles to place under the baker or casserole.

More Ovenware Patterns Of Glasbake

Blue Floral
Blue Fruit
Brown Floral
Daisy Days
Fleur de Lis
Grecian
Green Floral
Ivy
Mushroom
Red Floral
Snowflaake
Wheat
Queen Anne
Hen baker
Glabake patioware
Glasbake baking Shells

Other Glasbake Products

Hottles (serve coffee, soup, hot beverages).
Measuring Cups
Cereal bowl
Florette platter
Flamex saucepan
Mix Master Bowl Sets
Mugs
Percolator
Glasbake & Range-tec
Covered individual casseroles

Read More;

Florence's Ovenware by Gene and Cathy Florence, Collectorbooks.com

Kitchen Glassware of the Depression Years by Cathy and Gene Florence, Collectorbooks.com

McKee Kitchen Glass of the Depression Years by Barbara E. Mauzy, SchifferBooks

Flamex Information: http://www.oldstuff.com/

Photos Courtesy of :
http://www.etsy.com/shop/vintagejunque
http://sewshesews.wordpress.com/
http://www.etsy.com/shop/BusyBree
http://www.etsy.com/shop/PreserveCottage

C. Dianne Zweig is the author of Hot Kitchen & Home Collectibles of the 30s, 40s, 50s and Hot Cottage Collectibles for Vintage Style Homes. She is also the Editor of Iantiqueonline.com an actively growing internet based resource community for people who buy, sell or collect antiques, collectibles and art. You can find Dianne’s fabulous retro and vintage kitchen, home and cottage collectibles at The Collinsville Antiques Company of New Hartford, CT, a 22,000 feet antique emporium with an in-house retro café.To read more articles by C. Dianne Zweig click on this link: C. Dianne Zweig’s Blog Kitsch ‘n Stuff Email me at dianne@cdiannezweig.comVisit my website, CDianneZweig.comDianne is a member of:The American Society of Journalists and AuthorsThe Authors Guild, Inc.

16 comments:

  1. Do you every come across Stangl pottery? My first set of dishes was Stangl and I kept a place setting. Then I inherited some pieces from my grandmother. She used to have a cake plate, cup and saucer of different patterns to use for her card playing group and that's what I have now. As a child I remember going to Flemington, NJ with my mother and grandmother and visiting the factory where they would purchase seconds. It would have been the early 50s. Anyway, I only rarely come across any pieces now, but I'm in Texas and it was made on the east coast.

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  2. My Grandma had alot of Glasbake in her kitchen, so it's near and dear to me! Thanks so much for this great post!

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  3. I always think Glasbake is so under rated..kind of llike the step child to fire king..I love it and use it often...Have you ever done a post on the exploding Pyrex (new)...very interesting...which is why I stick to pieces from the 70's...

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  4. I have a piece of glasbake that is oval, covered, approx 9" long and 6" wide. It has glasbake on the bottom with the number 235 above glasbake, and 225 below. It has some type of flower design in several places that kind of look like upside down lips. This is also on the lid. It is made of clear glass. Any info?

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  5. Thanks for all this info, very cool

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  6. Your blog is so informative. I stumbled across a pretty piece of glasbake at the thrift store yesterday and had never heard of it before. I came home, consulted your blog, and am now enlightened on the subject. Thanks so much.

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  7. I'm LOOKING FOR at least a lid for a GlasBake 549, oval dish. If someone has a dish WITH its lid - let's talk.
    Please email me at jsslrd@gmail.com
    Use GlasBake as the title of the message, please.
    Many thanks.
    Ken

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  8. I am confused about this statement:Glasbake made by Jeanette after 1961 usually have a J prefix followed by a number on the bottom of each piece.

    I have a 2 Qt Cameo casserole that has J514 on the bottom and I got this as a shower gift when I was married in 1957 but above shows after 1961? Can anyone explain this to me?

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    Replies
    1. I have that same clear glasbake casserole. I have used it as a bowl since DH and I moved in together. Had no idea until tonight what it even was! Mine says microwave safe.

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    2. I have that same clear glasbake casserole. I have used it as a bowl since DH and I moved in together. Had no idea until tonight what it even was! Mine says microwave safe.

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  9. Just the information I needed - thanks for posting this on your blog!

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  10. Hi, I have a huge white Glasbake bowl which says "Glasbake made for Sunbeam" at the bottom. I got it from a friend when she moved. I plan to bake a bread in it since I don't own a cast iron dutch pan. Can it withstand oven temperature of 450 F? Thanks and I hope to hear from you soon :D

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  11. I love the design! It is kinda vintage thing but all in all, it is really beautiful! Do they have an online store?

    glass coaster

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  12. I just want to thank you for sharing your information and your site or blog this is simple but nice article I've ever seen I like it I learn something today....university of tennessee collectibles

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  13. I have a Glasbake loaf pan with lid that my mother had for many years. Its marked with an 805 and a 15 on the bottom along with the name Glasbake and USA. Can you tell me if this was made in Jeannette, Pa...and how old it might be (1917-1953?).

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